Why does the Texas Constitution create a Fragmented Executive Branch?

Why did the Texas Constitution establish a Plural Executive? Why does Texas divide Power in the Executive and Judicial Branches? How does the Texas Constitution differ from the US Constitution?
why does the Texas constitution create a fragmented executive branch
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Among all the countries, the Texas government is different as Texas Constitution establishes a plural executive system that does not give full freedom to the Governor and his orders. The current constitution has been in effect since February 1876, which states that the state legislature can propose amendments that will be decided and approved by the local voters. So, why does the Texas Constitution create a fragmented executive branch? Are you excited to know why the Texas Constitution provides a separation of powers? So, let’s start and find out why does Texas Constitution separate powers among the branches of government.

1. Why does Constitution separate Powers among the Branches of Government?

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The constitution separate powers among the branches of government to make sure the powers control themselves and to prevent any one of the three branches from becoming too powerful which are Legislative, Executive, and Judiciary. Also, check out what were the strengths of the Articles of Confederation?

2. Why do We have the Separation of Powers?

The Texas Constitution has a separation of powers because it has divided the state government into three main branches: Legislative, Executive, and Judiciary. We have a Separation of powers for these to provide equal domains to each organization so that no organization uses excess power. In the next segments, you will see why does the Texas Constitution create a fragmented executive branch. (See Why is Government necessary?)

3. Why is the Executive Power at the State level considered Fragmented?

The executive power at the state level is considered fragmented because Texas has a dual executive which means that the governor needs to share his/her executive powers with the other officials who are elected and appointed. They are autonomous and relatively independent. These officials may be The attorney journal, lieutenant governor, commissioner of the General Land Office, commissioner of agriculture, and comptroller of public accounts. (Also read What is the time zone for Texas?)

4. Does the Texas Constitution have Separation of Powers?

Yes, the Texas Constitution have separation of powers. It has been separated into three branches. (See What is the difference between a senator and a governor, and which is higher in rank?)

5. Why does the Texas Constitution create a Fragmented Executive Branch?

The Texas Constitution created a fragmented executive branch because it does not give permission for an executive branch that is unified. The constitution requires the governor to take permission from the legislature before spending money and the governor must have permission from the legislature to veto a bill.

The Texas constitution created a fragmented executive branch because the people who framed the Texas constitution had this fear of executive power which was regarding the removal of the governor’s power. However, the Governor had the power to remove any member from his/her staff. This is the reason why does the Texas constitution create a fragmented executive branch. Must read about the Prime Minister and President.

6. Why did the Texas Constitution establish a Plural Executive?

The Texas Constitution establishes a plural executive to limit the powers of the governor which means no single official of the government is alone responsible for the executive branch of Texas.

7. What is the Primary effect of a Plural Executive Structure on Texas Government?

The primary effect of a plural executive structure on the Texas government is that the executive branches are fragmented and the power of the governor has been distributed among other government officials. (See What does State Province Mean?)

8. Why do Some Argue is the One Advantage of a Plural Executive in Texas?

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Some argue is the one advantage of a plural executive in Texas as it has limited the power of officials and has made them more responsible towards the public. Must read why did the articles of confederation fail?

9. Why does Texas divide Power in the Executive and Judicial Branches?

Texas divides power into the executive and judicial branches in order to limit the power of the Governor and prevent one branch from becoming more powerful than the other.

10. Why did the Writers of the Texas Constitution create 3 Separate Branches of Government?

The writers of the Texas Constitution created 3 separate branches of government so that every branch remain balanced and equal powers were distributed among them which ensured no government could dominate the other one. (See Why Was the Great Compromise Important?)

11. What Three Branches was the Texas Government divided into by the Constitution?

Three branches of the Texas government were divided by the Constitution are:

  • The Executive,
  • The Legislative, and
  • The Judiciary.

12. How does the Texas Constitution differ from the US Constitution?

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Besides answering why does the Texas constitution create a fragmented executive branch, note that the Texas Constitution differs from the US Constitution in many ways. One such is that the U.S. Constitution applies to the federal government with the states being subordinate, whereas the Texas Constitution (and all state constitutions) sets in writing what the state government can and cannot do with the counties being subordinate. (See Why is the American Flag Red, White, and Blue?)

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